If vultures can go what is next? , by Oliver Gray-Read

Today we hear of so many species ‘facing extinction’ or ‘wiped out over most of their range’ that we can become slightly de-sensitized and numb to what seems at time to be a grim and inevitable play with us playing the villain. In the last twenty years three species of Indian vulture have gone from being one of the most prolifically abundant raptors to top of the IUCN Critically Endangered list. The reason behind the current Indian Vulture disaster that befell those graceful giants of the sky is the same as for the cause of the declines in so many other species; humans. But is there something...
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A story of Bagwaal, by Frederique Lacraz

We left Dhikuli village with Sumantha Ghosh, Paramveer Singh Hayer, Oli Gray-Read, Pascale, Eric and Sarah-Eve Longsworth and myself and headed to the mountain areas to reach the village of Devidhura. The village is situated at the trijunction of Almora, Pithoragarh & Nainital districts. A unique feature of the fair is the image of the goddess, kept in a locked brass casket. This casket is taken in a procession to a nearby mountain spring where a blindfolded priest ritually bathes the image and replaces it in the casket.The “goal” of our journey was to go to see the festival of Bagwaal....
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Study on vultures begins, Tribune News Service

Dehradun, July 18 As a part of Vulture Study Programme, the research scholars from France have kick-started their study from today. The scholars will be here for three months. These researchers of France University are undergoing National Diploma in Environment and have created special study sites at Ringora village, to study vultures who have their nests in the region in big numbers. While dwindling number of vultures in the country have been a cause of concern, Uttarakhand has somehow recorded these vultures in good numbers. Jacob, a scholar said that studying vultures in Corbett would certainly...
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Jacob Graham-Savoie

Jacob worked with us for the conservation of Indian vultures in general and more specifically the critically endangered White-rumped vulture, during three months. Their big decline is due to the use of an anti-inflammatory drug, Diclofenac, which is given to the cattle when sick. The problem with this drug is that when it is ingested by the vultures, it makes them die in few days. And only one carcass is enough to eradicate a whole colony. While he was here, Jacob stayed at Ringora’s homestay. It was an ideal place to work since there is a colony of White-rumped vultures in three trees, located...
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