Tiger Hair Analysis, by S.K. Gupta

  Tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti) hair analysis from Uttarakhand, by S.K. Gupta, Scientist from Wildlife Institute of India, Wildlife Forensic Lab, Dehradun 2010. A report on similarity test of two hair samples of Tiger (Panthera tigris)     Abstract: Two tiger hair samples were sent by Frederique Lacraz, Society for Mahseer Conservancy, Ramnagar, Uttarakhand to Wildlife Institute of India. Those two tiger hair samples were collected in the same area (Tera village) where there has been two attacks on ladies by tigers. The reason for a DNA analysis was to identify, whether both the sample...
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My Amazing Time in Corbett, by Heather Wilson

Deciding on a trip to India was not an easy one with long haul flights and ‘all those injections’. However reading up about the country was exhilarating, the culture was nothing which I had ever experienced, the food was going to be different and no doubt take some getting used to and the wildlife, which was what I was most excited about, was vast. After landing and a bumpy but not too long drive to Tiger Camp at Corbett National Park, I was met by the most amazingly smiley faces, welcoming me at the reception with warmth and friendliness. As previously mentioned the wildlife I knew was going...
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Firewood collection: a traditionnal work, by Frederique Lacraz

Women collecting wood In India, a high density of people is dependant on forest products in order to cook, to heat the houses and to feed the cattle. This has been a tradition for decades if not centuries among Indian villagers. Wood is indeed a privileged energy source since it is free of cost and is, for now on, still available. But this wood collection is step by step destroying the ecosystems of the forests. The forest products collected which are bark, dead and green wood and grass all participate in the balance to keep forests in good health. The barks are protecting the trees from any aggression;...
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One last chance to spot the elusive tiger?, by Philip Game

We step off the highway into the silent forest, following a foot track down into the valley of the Ramganga. Tiger’s pug or pawprint indicates the age and health of the animal We glimpse a lone sambar deer, more timid than the chital; the canine bark of the barking deer reaches us from a bend ahead. Porcupines and wild boar have dug up the ground in many places. Tiger scat, examined by expert eyes, reveals fur and crushed bones from its last kill: that is as close as I’ll come to a face-to-face encounter with the king of the forests. Tiger hunting has long since ceased, but the ‘king of...
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Fishing for Tiger, by Philip Game

If you don’t spot a tiger in India’s Corbett Tiger Reserve, at least the fish are biting. “Tiger is giving us dodge”, declares wildlife guide Hem Bahuguna, calling a halt near some tell-tale pug marks (pawprints) and scrapings. As the engine cools, then stills, we hear only the birds, the soft breeze and the distant chattering of monkeys. From time to time, another jeep materialises, stopping to exchange a few words. Otherwise, here in India, most crowded of nations, there is perfect peace. Corbett is India’s first, perhaps finest, Tiger Reserve and is buffered by surrounding tracts of...
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Subrati Ahmed

He whom the gods love dies young. Discipline and dedication sum up Subrati the forester. Subrati joined forest department in 1988 and ever since didn’t look back. He was honest and hard working person. He had good knowledge of wildlife as well as meticulous office work. Be it anti-poaching of fire-fighting he was often the groupleader. On the fateful evening of 09 September 2006 Subrati passed away in the line of duty and the tiger lost one of it’s most dedicated guards.
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Chander Singh Negi

He is however known more as Jolly Uncle. Jolly joined the Forest Department in Garwal as a dakwallah or postman in 1956 when he was just 16. Also known as The Tiger Man of Corbett Jolly has witnessed when India’s finest national park Hailey National Park was renamed as the Ramganga National Park and then in 1956 as the Corbett National Park and finally he saw Project Tiger being launched from the  Corbett Tiger Reserve in 1973. Jolly has never known fear and never will. While serving with the forest department he has caught several poachers and has caught hunting army soldiers, a member of legislative...
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Laurie Burette

Laurie is a French student and was based at Ringora to study the wildlife corridor between Corbett Tiger Reserve and the adjoining forest of Ramnagar Forest Division with us during three months, focusing on tigers’ movement. She went every morning walking on the road to notice any animal been killed by vehicles and also walked in the main nulla (seasonal stream) in Ringora used by wildlife, including tigers, to go from the Corbett Tiger Reserve to the Kosi River and beyond. In this nulla, she was looking for any signs of tiger or elephant and when there was, she took pictures of the pugmarks....
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Brijender Singh

A legendary veteran of Corbett, he gave us valuable inputs on conservation of the Ramganga  River and on its monarc the Golden Mahseer and ethical ways of fishing. Brijender Singh, or just Brij has been the Honorary Warden of Corbett Tiger Reserve since 1982. He was recently awarded the Esso Award. The award recognizes the efforts of an individual or an organization for bravery, valor and lifetime dedicated to Tiger Conservation. Popularly known as Raja sahib he belongs to the royalty of Dada Siba in Himachal Pradesh and Kapurthala. Influenced by the well known hunter Colonel ANW Powell (Author...
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