Initiation to the Ramganga, by Sumantha Ghosh

Emanating from Dudhatoli, some 140 km north of Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR) in the Himalayan foothills, the Western Ramganga is also known as the Corbett Ramganga or just Ramganga. Since Ramganga is not a snow-fed river, fishing is a throughout the year attraction. Fishing is permitted on the 100 km stretch from Nagteley to Masi in the Upper Ramganga reaches from 15th of June till the 30th of September. You can enjoy the thrill of sport fishing in the exclusive beats around Vanghat from the 1st of October till the 15th of June, each season. The upper Ramganga is a typical Himalayan river with deep...
read more

Chilwa (Chela argentea), by Sumantha Ghosh

Chilwa is the most common fish of the Ramganga. They run usually about six inches in length, the biggest specimens growing up to a feet in length. It has a long more or less compressed body with a small head and upturned mouth. A bright silvery fish, covered with minute silver scales which come off very easily when handled. It usually keeps to the surface of the water. When freshly caught in running water, its coloring is most beautiful. The brilliant silver of its scales contrasts with the pale greenish sheen of its back, giving a fleeting radiance. Chilwa has a habit of continually throwing itself...
read more

Indian trout (Barilius bola), by Sumantha Ghosh

Belonging to the baril family, there are 14 varieties resident in India. Most of these take a fly with great interest. Despite being sporting fish, barils don’t grow to more than ten inches, except one variety—Barilius bola or the Indian trout, which tilts the scales at 5 lbs. The Indian trout can be found in any of the streams of Northen India and Assam. It prefers slow moving water above a rapid with fairly large boulders, to the actual rapid itself. It is silvery in color and has two or more rows of bluish blotches along the sides. Its caudal fin is orange stained with grey and black, while...
read more

Kalabanse (Labeo calbasu),by Sumantha Ghosh

Known as Patthar chatta in Kumaon and Kali machli in Garhwalare, Kalabanse is a greeny-grey fish with the pink tinged scales. It is also characterized with pink eyes and grows to almost 3 feet in length and tipping the scales at 25 lbs in the Ramganga. A true bottom feeder the Kalabanse, its mouth protrudes downwards when open and has a distinct fringe on the upper lip. It has a partiality for mossy, slippery rocks and sunken trees in the river and can be seen playing about in such places, sucking and rubbing its sides against the rock or trees, as the case may be. Kalabanse is a game fish and...
read more

Goonch (Bagarius bagarius), the giant catfish, by Sumantha Ghosh

Widespread throughout Asia, India is known for the largest species of goonch. Owing to their voracity, their formidable teeth and general appearance, they are also referred to as the fresh water shark and grows to a length of almost six feet. Its body is usually dirty grey with large irregular black or dark brown markings. Its fins usually have a dark band across them and sprout from a dark base. They are scaleless fish and have fleshy feelers attached to their mouth. Goonch is a predaceous fish and lies in wait for its food in the swiftest water of the rapids, where it maintains position by adhering...
read more

Golden Mahseer (Tor putitora), Monarch of Himalayan waters, by Sumantha Ghosh

The undisputed lord of Himalayan rivers is the handsome golden-scaled highlander. Undeniably, the mahseer is one of the fiercest fighting freshwater game fish that exists. Pound for pound it had unparalleled strength and endurance. Mahseer does have a transitory likeness to the carp and the barbell of the English waters, but as they say, the similarity soon ends in the turbid waters of the Himalayan foothills. The mahseer shows more sport for its size then a salmon and therefore considered the best sportfish in the world….this is what snobs (??) of the Raj era had to say. Mahseer have overjoyed...
read more

Khattas – Paradox of Indian Wildlife, by Sumantha Ghosh

Ringora Khatta is located on the right bank of Kosi River, 5 km from Ramnagar. It is surrounded by the forest of Ramnagar Forest Division and Corbett Tiger Reserve Khatta in the past were used by people from the mountains who would camp here during their barter trips locally called Dhakar to the Ramnagar bazaar. Similarly many herdsmen from mountains would camp in these Khattas as their winter dwellings with there cattle. Khatta’s are forest land and therefore the present day village of Ringora does not have revenue village status and treated like Forest village. Being located in the vicinity...
read more

Priceless Neema Dolls, by Frederique Lacraz

Neema In the village of Ringora, dist. Nainital, a girl named Neema is making artefact using local raw material, the “saan”. Her products are the only local creation that can be found in and around Corbett, making it priceless. But Neema is not only a brand, it represents a whole history of Kumaoni women who work incredibly hard every day. Their daily life starts early morning, where they go inside the jungle to collect firewood and grass, to cook and heat the houses, to feed the cattle but also to collect this particular grass that is much needed to repair the roofs and that can be sold at...
read more

Rajiv Bhartari, a fine blend of wildlife conservation and eco-tourism

Whilst Field Director of Corbett National Park Mr Bhartari turned it into one of the Finest Parks in the world and one that India can be very proud of today. It’s a great pleasure to see people getting acknowledged for their hard work and achievements and we would like to wish Mr Bhartari all he best for future success in his endeavours.
read more

Fire, a good control technique for Lantana?, by Frederique Lacraz

In the many attempts made by men to get rid of the unwanted weed Lantana camara, one technique was often chosen: the fire control. The idea of this method is first to uproot the plant, then to put the roots up in the air (to avoid them to go towards the ground and grow back again) and finally to let it dry for several days. When the plant is dry enough, it is burnt. Fire is one of the major factors for such species, which is not only depleting undergrowth but also facilitating the germination of the weed. The fire has an impact on its frequency, abundance, density and basal cover. After fire incidences...
read more
Page 1 of 3123